Eczema

Health Condition - Eczema

General Description

 

Eczema is a condition where patches of skin become inflamed, itchy, red, cracked, and rough. Blisters may sometimes occur.

 

The word “eczema” is also used specifically to talk about atopic dermatitis, the most common type of eczema.

 

“Atopic” refers to a collection of diseases involving the immune system, including atopic dermatitis, asthma, and hay fever. Dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin.

 

Causes

 

Environmental factors are also known to bring out the symptoms of eczema, such as:

  • Irritants: These include soaps, detergents, shampoos, disinfectants, juices from fresh fruits, meats, or vegetables.
  • Allergens: Dust mites, pets, pollens, mold, and dandruff can lead to eczema.
  • Microbes: These include bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, viruses, and certain fungi.
  • Hot and cold temperatures: Very hot or cold weather, high and low humidity, and perspiration from exercise can bring out eczema.
  • Foods: Dairy products, eggs, nuts and seeds, soy products, and wheat can cause eczema flare-ups.
  • Stress: This is not a direct cause of eczema but can make symptoms worse.
  • Hormones: Women can experience increased eczema symptoms at times when their hormone levels are changing, for example during pregnancy and at certain points in the menstrual cycle.

 

Fast facts on eczema

 

Here are some key points about eczema. More detail and supporting information is in the main article.

  • Certain foods can trigger symptoms, such as nuts and dairy.
  • Symptoms vary according to the age of the person with eczema, but they often include scaly, itchy patches of skin.
  • Eczema can also be triggered by environmental factors like smoke and pollen. However, eczema is not a curable condition.
  • Treatment focuses on healing damaged skin and alleviating symptoms. There is not yet a full cure for eczema, but symptoms can be managed.
  • Eczema is not a contagious condition.

 

Symptoms

 

The symptoms of atopic dermatitis can vary, depending on the age of the person with the condition.

 

Atopic dermatitis commonly occurs in infants, with dry and scaly patches appearing on the skin. These patches are often intensely itchy.

 

Most people develop atopic dermatitis before the age of 5 years. Half of those who develop the condition in childhood continue to have symptoms as an adult.
However, these symptoms are often different to those experienced by children.
People with the condition will often experience periods of time where their symptoms flare up or worsen, followed by periods of time where their symptoms will improve or clear up.

 

Symptoms in infants under 2 years old

  • Rashes commonly appear on the scalp and cheeks.
  • Rashes usually bubble up before leaking fluid.
  • Rashes can cause extreme itchiness. This may interfere with sleeping. Continuous rubbing and scratching can lead to skin infections.

 

Symptoms in children aged 2 years until puberty

 

  • Rashes commonly appear behind the creases of elbows or knees.
  • They are also common on the neck, wrists, ankles, and the crease between buttock and legs.

 

Over time, the following symptoms can occur:

  • Rashes can become bumpy.
  • Rashes can lighten or darken in color.
  • Rashes can thicken in a process known as lichenification. The rashes can then develop knots and a permanent itch.

 

Symptoms in adults

  • Rashes commonly appear in creases of the elbows or knees or the nape of the neck.
  • Rashes cover much of the body.
  • Rashes can be especially prominent on the neck, face, and around the eyes.
  • Rashes can cause very dry skin.
  • Rashes can be permanently itchy.
  • Rashes in adults can be more scaly than those occurring in children.
  • Rashes can lead to skin infections.

 

Adults who developed atopic dermatitis as a child but no longer experience the condition may still have dry or easily-irritated skin, hand eczema, and eye problems.

 

The appearance of skin affected by atopic dermatitis will depend on how much a person scratches and whether the skin is infected. Scratching and rubbing further irritate the skin, increase inflammation, and make itchiness worse.

 

Conventional Treatment

 

There is no cure for eczema. Treatment for the condition aims to heal the affected skin and prevent flare-ups of symptoms. Doctors will suggest a plan of treatment based on an individual’s age, symptoms, and current state of health.
For some people, eczema goes away over time. For others, it remains a lifelong condition.

 

Medications

 

There are several medications that doctors can prescribe to treat the symptoms of eczema, including:

  • Topical corticosteroid creams and ointments: These are a type of anti-inflammatory medication and should relieve the main symptoms of eczema, such as skin inflammation and itchiness. They are applied directly to the skin. If you want to buy topical corticosteroid creams and ointments, then there is an excellent selection online with thousands of customer reviews.
  • Systemic corticosteroids: If topical treatments are not effective, systemic corticosteroids can be prescribed. These are either injected or taken by mouth, and they are only used for short periods of time.
  • Antibiotics: These are prescribed if eczema occurs alongside a bacterial skin infection.
  • Antiviral and antifungal medications: These can treat fungal and viral infections that occur.
  • Antihistamines: These reduce the risk of nighttime scratching as they can cause drowsiness.
  • Topical calcineurin inhibitors: This is a type of drug that suppresses the activities of the immune system. It decreases inflammation and helps prevent flare-ups.
  • Barrier repair moisturizers: These reduce water loss and work to repair the skin.
  • Phototherapy: This involves exposure to ultraviolet A or B waves, alone or combined. The skin will be monitored carefully. This method is normally used to treat moderate dermatitis.

 

Even though the condition itself is not yet curable, there should be a particular treatment plan to suit each person with different symptoms. Even after an area of skin has healed, it is important to keep looking after it, as it may easily become irritated again.

 

BMS Approach

 

If you had tried various conventional treatments, and still do not have any improvement. There are possibilities that you might have heavy metal accumulated in your body.

 

Our doctor begin by identifying the underlying cause of your Eczema, followed by a metal test, before putting together a suitable treatment plan.

 

BMS Treatment

 

Chelation Therapy