Diabetes

Diabetes

General Description

 

Diabetes is a condition that impairs the body’s ability to process blood glucose, otherwise known as blood sugar.

 

Without ongoing, careful management, diabetes can lead to a buildup of sugars in the blood, which can increase the risk of dangerous complications, including stroke and heart disease.

 

Different kinds of diabetes can occur, and managing the condition depends on the type. Not all forms of diabetes stem from a person being overweight or leading an inactive lifestyle. In fact, some are present from childhood.

 

Three major diabetes types can develop: Type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes.

 

Type I diabetes: Also known as juvenile diabetes, this type occurs when the body fails to produce insulin. People with type I diabetes are insulin-dependent, which means they must take artificial insulin daily to stay alive.

 

Type 2 diabetes: Type 2 diabetes affects the way the body uses insulin. While the body still makes insulin, unlike in type I, the cells in the body do not respond to it as effectively as they once did. This is the most common type of diabetes, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and it has strong links with obesity.

 

Gestational diabetes: This type occurs in women during pregnancy when the body can become less sensitive to insulin. Gestational diabetes does not occur in all women and usually resolves after giving birth.

Less common types of diabetes include monogenic diabetes and cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

 

Symptoms

 

Diabetes symptoms are caused by rising blood sugar.

 

General symptoms

 

The general symptoms of diabetes include:

 

Symptoms in men

 

In addition to the general symptoms of diabetes, men with diabetes may have a decreased sex driveerectile dysfunction (ED), and poor muscle strength.

 

Symptoms in women

 

Women with diabetes can also have symptoms such as urinary tract infectionsyeast infections, and dry, itchy skin.

 

Type 1 diabetes

 

Symptoms of type 1 diabetes can include:

  • extreme hunger
  • increased thirst
  • unintentional weight loss
  • frequent urination
  • blurry vision
  • tiredness

 

It may also result in mood changes.

 

Type 2 diabetes

 

Symptoms of type 2 diabetes can include:

  • increased hunger
  • increased thirst
  • increased urination
  • blurry vision
  • tiredness
  • sores that are slow to heal

 

It may also cause recurring infections. This is because elevated glucose levels make it harder for the body to heal.

 

Gestational diabetes

 

Most women with gestational diabetes don’t have any symptoms. The condition is often detected during a routine blood sugar test or oral glucose tolerance test that is usually performed between the 24th and 28th weeks of gestation.

 

In rare cases, a woman with gestational diabetes will also experience increased thirst or urination.

 

Gestational diabetes is the result of hormonal changes during pregnancy. The placenta produces hormones that make a pregnant woman’s cells less sensitive to the effects of insulin. This can cause high blood sugar during pregnancy.

 

Women who are overweight when they get pregnant or who gain too much weight during their pregnancy are more likely to get gestational diabetes.

 

Causes

 

Different causes are associated with each type of diabetes.

 

Type 1 diabetes

 

Doctors don’t know exactly what causes type 1 diabetes. For some reason, the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.

 

Genes may play a role in some people. It’s also possible that a virus sets off the immune system attack.

 

Type 2 diabetes

 

Type 2 diabetes stems from a combination of genetics and lifestyle factors. Being overweight or obese increases your risk too. Carrying extra weight, especially in your belly, makes your cells more resistant to the effects of insulin on your blood sugar.

This condition runs in families. Family members share genes that make them more likely to get type 2 diabetes and to be overweight.

 

Gestational diabetes

 

Gestational diabetes is the result of hormonal changes during pregnancy. The placenta produces hormones that make a pregnant woman’s cells less sensitive to the effects of insulin. This can cause high blood sugar during pregnancy.

 

Women who are overweight when they get pregnant or who gain too much weight during their pregnancy are more likely to get gestational diabetes.

 

Conventional Treatment

 

Doctors treat diabetes with a few different medications. Some of these drugs are taken by mouth, while others are available as injections.

 

Type 1 diabetes

 

Insulin is the main treatment for type 1 diabetes. It replaces the hormone your body isn’t able to produce.

 

There are four types of insulin that are most commonly used. They’re differentiated by how quickly they start to work, and how long their effects last:

  • Rapid-acting insulin starts to work within 15 minutes and its effects last for 3 to 4 hours.
  • Short-acting insulin starts to work within 30 minutes and lasts 6 to 8 hours.
  • Intermediate-acting insulin starts to work within 1 to 2 hours and lasts 12 to 18 hours.
  • Long-acting insulin starts to work a few hours after injection and lasts 24 hours or longer.

 

Type 2 diabetes

 

Diet and exercise can help some people manage type 2 diabetes. If lifestyle changes aren’t enough to lower your blood sugar, you’ll need to take medication.

 

These drugs lower your blood sugar in a variety of ways:

Types of drug How they work Example(s)
Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors Slow your body’s breakdown of sugars and starchy foods Acarbose (Precose) and miglitol (Glyset)
Biguanides Reduce the amount of glucose your liver makes Metformin (Glucophage)
DPP-4 inhibitors Improve your blood sugar without making it drop too low Linagliptin (Tradjenta), saxagliptin (Onglyza), and sitagliptin (Januvia)
Glucagon-like peptides Change the way your body produces insulin Dulaglutide (Trulicity), exenatide (Byetta), and liraglutide (Victoza)
Meglitinides Stimulate your pancreas to release more insulin Nateglinide (Starlix) and repaglinide (Prandin)
SGLT2 inhibitors Release more glucose into the urine Canagliflozin (Invokana) and dapagliflozin (Farxiga)
Sulfonylureas Stimulate your pancreas to release more insulin Glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase), glipizide (Glucotrol), and glimepiride (Amaryl)
Thiazolidinediones Help insulin work better Pioglitazone (Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia)

 

You may need to take more than one of these drugs. Some people with type 2 diabetes also take insulin.

 

Gestational diabetes

 

You’ll need to monitor your blood sugar level several times a day during pregnancy. If it’s high, dietary changes and exercise may or may not be enough to bring it down.

 

According to the Mayo Clinic, about 10 to 20 percent of women with gestational diabetes will need insulin to lower their blood sugar. Insulin is safe for the growing baby.

 

BMS Approach

 

If you had tried various conventional treatments, and still do not have any improvement. There are possibilities that you might have heavy metal accumulated in your body.

 

Our doctor begin by identifying the underlying cause of your Diabetes, followed by a metal test, before putting together a suitable treatment plan.

 

BMS Treatment

 

Chelation Therapy